Nanorestore Plus®

Overview

Calcium hydroxide nanoparticles dispersed in short-chain alcohols (also known as "nanolime") are highly compatible with carbonate-based materials, such as wall paintings and carbonatic stone. Due to their compatibility, they represent an alternative to traditional consolidation materials used in restoration practice, for instance synthetic polymer coatings that exhibit poor compatibility with inorganic porous works of art and can produce detrimental effects in the long-term.
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Available Formulations
Nanorestore Plus®
Ethanol 5
Calcium hydroxide nanoparticles dispersed in ethanol at a concentration of 5 g/L. These particles are specifically designed for consolidation purposes. 35 €/L
Nanorestore Plus®
Ethanol 10
Calcium hydroxide nanoparticles dispersed in ethanol at a concentration of 10 g/L. These particles are specifically designed for consolidation purposes. 50 €/L
Nanorestore Plus®
Propanol 5
Calcium hydroxide nanoparticles dispersed in 2-propanol at a concentration of 5 g/L. These particles are specifically designed for consolidation purposes. 35 €/L
Nanorestore Plus®
Propanol 10
Calcium hydroxide nanoparticles dispersed in 2-propanol at a concentration of 10 g/L. These particles are specifically designed for consolidation purposes. 50 €/L

Please, note that all the prices on the website do not include 22% VAT
Technical Information

When are they used?

Due to several reasons (pollution, weathering, mechanical stress) wall paintings and stones lose their original cohesion during time. When this happens a consolidation intervention has to be performed in order to recover the mechanical properties of the material and avoid the loss of the pictorial layer.

How do they work?

The particles penetrate into the pores and cracks of the artifacts, where they act as a binder for the de-cohered layers and powdering surface of the works of art by turning into calcium carbonate through the reaction with atmospheric CO2. The carbonation process is highly favored by the nano-size of the particles.

How are they used?

The dispersions of nanoparticles are typically applied either by brushing (over Japanese paper) or by spraying them over the artifact's surface. A humid cellulose poultice, or a light spray of water, is then applied onto the treated surface to prevent the formation of white veils and to favor the transformation of the hydroxide particles into carbonate. Full carbonation then takes place in 2-3 weeks, also depending on the hydrothermal conditions. Several cycles of application can be carried out if need be to provide consolidation of the weakened surface.

For further information, please refer to the technical sheet.

Reference textbooks



1. Piero Baglioni and David Chelazzi, Nanoscience for the Conservation of Works of Art, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2013

2. Piero Baglioni, David Chelazzi and Rodorico Giorgi, Nanotechnologies in the Conservation of Cultural Heritage: A Compendium of Materials and Techniques, Springer, 2014
The classic nanolime dispersion NANORESTORE® produced by CSGI is currently distributed by CTS. Please refer to CTS website.
For any information, please, contact us!
products@csgi.unifi.it
Tel.: +39 055 457 3050
Products developed within EU NANOFORART Project